Film musical – Carol Channing http://carolchanning.org/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 10:50:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://carolchanning.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-29T131401.023-150x150.png Film musical – Carol Channing http://carolchanning.org/ 32 32 Love and Thunder’ – Deadline https://carolchanning.org/love-and-thunder-deadline/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 04:05:00 +0000 https://carolchanning.org/love-and-thunder-deadline/ British singer Kate Bush’s music has almost become part of the MCU. Christian Bale who plays Gorr the butcher god in Thor: Love and Thunder told Total Film that director Taika Waititi had planned a dance scene inspired by Bush’s music, but that was scrapped. “Taika and I wanted to do a whole dance, which […]]]>

British singer Kate Bush’s music has almost become part of the MCU.

Christian Bale who plays Gorr the butcher god in Thor: Love and Thunder told Total Film that director Taika Waititi had planned a dance scene inspired by Bush’s music, but that was scrapped.

“Taika and I wanted to do a whole dance, which we couldn’t do, but we had all this Kate Bush stuff we worked on,” Bale said. He continues: “I think he just realized that he would never be allowed to put that in the final film. I would say the most common thing I looked at [while preparing for the role] was Aphex Twin’s video for ‘Come to Daddy’. But I don’t even know if it will be in the final film.

His song “Running Up That Hill”, from his album “Hounds of Love” has enjoyed a resurgence after being featured in the fourth season of Netflix stranger thingsand topped the UK charts.

On his personal blog, Bush thanked stranger things show runners Matt and Ross Duffer for using the song and giving it new life among Gen Z.

“I salute the Duffer Brothers for their courage – taking this new series to a much more adult and darker place. I want to thank them so much for bringing the song into the lives of so many people,” the singer said. “By presenting Running Up That Hill in such a positive light – as a talisman for Max (one of the main female characters played by actress Sadie Sink) – the song was brought into the emotional arena of its story. fear, conflict and the power of love are all around her and her friends.

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This forgotten musical has butts, full frontal nudity and political commentary https://carolchanning.org/this-forgotten-musical-has-butts-full-frontal-nudity-and-political-commentary/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 15:37:22 +0000 https://carolchanning.org/this-forgotten-musical-has-butts-full-frontal-nudity-and-political-commentary/ It’s rare that I see a movie that doesn’t look completely like any other movie I’ve ever seen: largely because most movies tap into the vast reservoir of inspiration and visual shorthand created by every movie that puts it there. came before, whether the filmmakers were aware of it or not. So many movies are […]]]>

It’s rare that I see a movie that doesn’t look completely like any other movie I’ve ever seen: largely because most movies tap into the vast reservoir of inspiration and visual shorthand created by every movie that puts it there. came before, whether the filmmakers were aware of it or not. So many movies are copies of each other, or color-by-number genre slices, which is why I’m in a constant state of disappointment around them.

The 1993 musical AIDS Zero patience, however, completely breaks the mold, in the best possible way. I don’t often feel seen by the movies I watch (at least, not in a good way) but from the moment I pressed play on John Greyson’s quirky masterpiece, I got felt spoken to, and ever since have recommended this movie to everyone I meet, describing it as “one of the most Henry movies you’ll ever see”.

The premise, admittedly, is extremely henry: in this alternate history, 19th-century explorer and sexologist Richard Burton (not to be confused with the actor) is alive and well after an “altercation” with the Fountain of Youth. Since the early 1900s, he spent his time quietly working in the taxidermy department of a Canadian museum of natural history. In the early 90s, he decided to do an exhibition on the infamous “patient zero”, the flight attendant of legend who was randomly blamed and scapegoated for (wrongly) being labeled as the first person to bring AIDS to North America. We’ve since moved past that founding myth, but in Canada in the early 1990s, not disclosing your HIV status could land you in jail, and “patient zero” was still considered enemy number one by a world desperate to blame AIDS on one sexually promiscuous person.

Burton – who also rose to infamy in the Victorian era for his translations of One Thousand and One Nights and his penis size experiments – finds himself dispassionately interested at first in the story of “Patient Zero”, until until the ghost of “Zero” himself appears. He was suspended somewhere between “existential limbo and the primordial void”, and now, for some reason, he is back on earth, wandering, visiting his old haunts and friends. But they can’t see it. The only person who can perceive it is Richard Burton, who decides to base a new exhibition in the museum around Patient Zero as a kind of “serial killer”. It takes getting to know Zero and starting a romantic relationship with him to change Burton’s mind. But of course, the public still wants to believe that AIDS is some sort of thriller, going back to a single “author”.

The story within the story of a nation struggling to tell the “story” of AIDS can only be appealing. The fact that it’s a musical also pulls things together in a particularly raging way. For a generation of gay people sick of being killed, ignored, and then blamed for their own affliction, it seems like the most natural thing in the world is to craft a musical based on the Scheherezade tale. When the film opens, a child recites the familiar story of the King’s wife condemned to death unless she can provide a story interesting enough to tell her husband that evening. She does and continues to tell stories each night afterward to save his life, and from there, according to the story, comes “1001 Thousand and One Nights”, which Burton translated into English in 1888.

In the next scene, we see Zero the ghost, singing “tell my story/save my life” in a weirdly REM-style pop song. It’s the kind of chaotic mix of influences here that I love the most: the idea that a prudish figure from the 1800s would fall in love with the ghost of an unfairly criminalized French-Canadian flight attendant and end up sing about it in a museum setting where the stuffed animals start to come alive and fuck each other. The African Green Parrot – another AIDS scapegoat blamed for ‘triggering’ the plague – becomes a butch woman begging for a cigarette. She points to the inherent racism in blaming everything on Africa, another “fake” AIDS story.

The fact that much of the action takes place in a museum – the place where our cultural myths and often inaccurate factual beliefs are decided and enshrined for years – is also telling. It’s not just a musical, or an AIDS drama, or even – as in the case of Jeffrey—a comedy about AIDS. It’s an attempt to wrest the AIDS narrative from the straight establishment. It’s a necessary activity both in 1993 and today, since straight people can only think in terms of “victim” and “perpetrator”, good versus bad, clean versus sinner. The film is an attack on binary thinking, on straight filmmaking practices, on anyone who thinks cinema should adhere to some kind of inherent respectability politics.

Zero patience is a film that throws everything at the wall and lets it stick. It doesn’t matter if it’s messy, sometimes confusing, often ridiculous and light-defying on a topic that couldn’t get any heavier. More importantly, he understands time in a specifically weird way. He sees how haunted we are by our own founding myths and misunderstandings. And it puts our lives in conversation with the world of the past. That’s always what I’m looking for: works that reject the whole notion of linear time, distinctions between the living and the dead, and ideas of the past as a fixed, museum-like place, rather than a painting. constantly evolving. attitudes and behaviors. Why mess with art that assumes the past is dead and not in constant conversation with the present?

It also doesn’t hurt that there’s an entire number sung by talking puppets. I told you it was a very Henry movie.

The word “irreverent”, I think, is one of the highest praises there is. Much of filmmaking fails by toeing the line – by being too polite or too scared to stray from a perceived norm. For me, there is nothing more exciting than work that plays with history, that invites and encourages anachronism. For years I tried to write a novel that tries to do everything Zero patience perform without fail. I realized, watching it, that what I really wanted to do was make a book that was actually a musical, or make a movie that was secretly a book. I want to pervert shapes and combine things that shouldn’t make sense together, and that’s part of why it’s so hard to work on this thing that I know will never really be finished. But isn’t that the point of making art? Trying to do what you’ve been told is “impossible?” Trying to do something that’s too weird, too unsightly, too in-your-face to be marketable?

Maybe. That’s part of the problem: I don’t know. I’m too entangled in the market. Maybe I don’t have the balls to keep my job as weird as I would like, since I already feel pretty alienated and know I have to sell something eventually, even though basically I don’t believe I have anything to give away that can easily be sold. It’s Pride season right now, something I’ve always had a difficult relationship with. Sometimes I feel like Pride is what straight people actually want from us, despite it being discussed in our story as a seminal riot. It was, but it is not anymore. If you’ve lived long enough to hear the name “Marsha P. Johnson” uttered by a straight boy on TikTok to explain why he’s wearing nail polish, well, you may have lived too long. Maybe being gay was always meant to be a fucking ass thing, and the minute it became less than subversive, so did our collective identity as queer people. Now everyone is writing novels, memoirs and teen TV shows about how wonderful it is to be gay and I have to ask myself: why is my job and my life so miserable?

These are the things I think about daily. But then when I’m about to try and change everything I am for a shot at safety and comfort, I see something like this, and I remember how it feels to something really obtain you. The loneliness does not disappear completely, but it softens a little.

I remember that we can’t accept to be ordinary, to be celebrated by the banks or to be hated by the politicians. We must continue to be strangely defiant in the face of a society that wants us castrated or killed.

Movies like this do that and then get forgotten. But fortunately, the history of a film is never finished, not really. They can be rediscovered, resuscitated, renewed for an audience finally ready to hear what they have to say. Yes, even when it’s hard to hear.

Especially then.♦

Zero patience airs on Criterion Channel as part of its Pride spotlight.

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The boys star Karen Fukuhara on this musical scene in episode 5 [Interview] https://carolchanning.org/the-boys-star-karen-fukuhara-on-this-musical-scene-in-episode-5-interview/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://carolchanning.org/the-boys-star-karen-fukuhara-on-this-musical-scene-in-episode-5-interview/ In Episode 4, the Boys clashed with a very lively and still young Soldier Boy, who effortlessly kicked all of their asses, including Kimiko. In a split second, Soldier Boy managed to kill her and strip her of her powers. Even a newly superpowered Hughie couldn’t help the situation. So when Kimiko wakes up in […]]]>

In Episode 4, the Boys clashed with a very lively and still young Soldier Boy, who effortlessly kicked all of their asses, including Kimiko. In a split second, Soldier Boy managed to kill her and strip her of her powers. Even a newly superpowered Hughie couldn’t help the situation.

So when Kimiko wakes up in the hospital in Episode 5 and realizes her powers are gone, she is overjoyed. In the previous episode, she bonded with Ryan, Becca and Homelander’s son, because of their overpowered curse, so it makes sense that she’s happy to get rid of it once and for all.

But that’s not all, since she then decided to embark on song and dance, inspired by Judy Garland singing “I Got Rhythm”.

“We had a lot of fun this season,” Karen Fukuhara told /Film during a press conference shortly before this season’s premiere of the show.

“Frenchie, played by Tomer [Capone], and I had so much fun. It was kind of like summer camp, going to all the dance practices. I felt so bad: he had an elevator in there. [laughs] Especially during the early stages, he was such a gentleman and said, ‘No, it’s okay, I can do it!’ I’m like, ‘I don’t know, I ate a lot, sorry.’ [laughs] But yeah, I would like to say it was a really good bonding experience for both of us.”

The sequence is a Technicolor dream, set entirely in a hospital ward, with nurses and patients following the choreography using everything from x-ray photos and crutches to a defibrillator as props. It’s a rare moment of joy in a show as dark and brutal as this. Unfortunately, much like the excellent karaoke sequence in “Doom Patrol,” this dance number was just a dream. Still, free from the powers and the pain they cause, perhaps Kimiko will finally find some kind of happiness. Again, it’s “The Boys”.

The first five episodes of “The Boys” Season 3 are streaming on Prime Video, with new episodes coming every Friday.

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The best books about women in music https://carolchanning.org/the-best-books-about-women-in-music/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 20:38:15 +0000 https://carolchanning.org/the-best-books-about-women-in-music/ Music critic Danyel Smith’s latest whipsmart, Shine Bright: A very personal story of black women in pop, is a masterful examination of black female artists who have indelibly shaped American popular music. Paying homage to the music that “strengthened” her through her toughest times growing up in Los Angeles in the 1970s through her career […]]]>

Music critic Danyel Smith’s latest whipsmart, Shine Bright: A very personal story of black women in pop, is a masterful examination of black female artists who have indelibly shaped American popular music. Paying homage to the music that “strengthened” her through her toughest times growing up in Los Angeles in the 1970s through her career as a music journalist, Smith offers an accurately written investigation into the Dixie Cups, the Sweet Inspirations and other women. who paved the way. Legends such as Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston and Janet Jackson also make appearances, as moving personalities who represent the challenges black women continue to face in the music industry and how they are reclaiming their struggles. to fuel their art.

Batteries on batteries on batteries. That’s how music books exist in my house. Books are my friends. Some of them are even written by my friends. I’m a longtime music writer and editor and the host/creator of the Spotify Original podcast Black girl songbook—a show centered around stories of black women making music of all kinds. So, yes: my typically neat, citrus-scented space homes pile on tottering, seemingly disorganized piles of tomes about musical life – sound and fury.

A look at a dining room shelf reveals Ella Fitzgerald: A Biography of the First Lady of Jazz by Stewart Nicholson and Her Name Is Barbra: An Intimate Portrait of the Real Barbra Streisand by Randall Riese—both from 1993. I also see Rock She Wrote: Women Write About Rock, Pop, and Rap (1995), edited by Evelyn McDonnell and Ann Powers. I myself have an essay in there, about beloved rap duo Gang Starr. My Friend Benjamin Meadows-Ingram’s 2015 Diary of a Madman: The Geto Boys, Life, Death, and the Roots of Southern Rap is next to The Supremes: a saga of dreams, successes and betrayals Motown of Mark Ribowsky, who is next to the prescient Flyboy in the Buttermilk: Essays on Contemporary America (1992) by genius music and cultural critic Greg Tate. I see too Book of ego trip rap lists (1992), co-written by a genius collective that includes my husband Elliott Wilson. It’s a stack. All are worth your time. It’s the women’s books, however, that shine. Each spine is a little marquee, tempting me to relive the stories and the soundtracks over and over again. Let’s take a look at some other stacks.

What’s new
Why Solange Matters (2021) by punk rocker Stephanie Phillips is as much a shimmering slice of biography as it is a challenge to bravery. Liner Notes for Revolution: The Intellectual Life of Black Feminist Sound (2021) is by Daphne Brooks of Yale University. I can hear her voice in my ear when she writes about “the long-standing tendency of pop music writers to think in hagiographical terms of…’queens’ (so many queens!)…who dazzled and destroyed the audience. from one generation to the next.” 2021 by Dawnie Walton The final revival of Opal & Nev it’s fiction, but history, but journalism – check it out for yourself. Clover Hope, author of The Motherlode: Over 100 Women Who Created Hip-Hop (2021) written as the gloriously nerdy former XXL, VIBEand Billboard editor that she is, and Rachelle Baker’s illustrations look, cooler than we’ll ever be.

be read
At Kathy Iandoli’s Babygirl: better known as Aaliyah (2021) terrified me – of my own grief. I’ll read it when I feel really, really strong. I can’t wait to jump in Celia: my life by the late Celia Cruz (2004), Shout, Sister, Shout! : The Untold Story of Rock-and-Roll Pioneer Sister Rosetta Tharpe by Gayle F. Wald (2007), and Carefree: my life as a suitor by Chrissy Hynde (2015) because I need to know even more about my favorite: “Brass In Pocket” from 1979. Queen: The Life and Music of Dinah Washington by Nadine Cohodas nods, just like Miss Rhythm: The Autobiography of Rhythm and Blues Legend Ruth Brown (with Andrew Yule, 1996).

Always in sight
Josephine by Joséphine Baker with Jo Bouillon (1977) is necessary, just like that of 2004 Soul on Soul: The Life and Music of Mary Lou Williams by Tammy L. Kernodle. And while the fact that Patti LaBelle’s enlightenment Don’t Block the Blessings: Revelations of a Lifetime (1996) ends with a quote from Sojourner Truth is wildly awesome, it’s Me, Tina: the story of my life by Tina Turner with Kurt Loder (1986) which stuck deep in my mind. Angela Bassett and Laurence Fishburne’s performances as Tina and Ike Turner in the 1993 film version What’s love got to do with it– are so iconic, and the former Anna Mae Bullock is such a revered figure, Me, Tina now functions as some kind of yellowed manuscript of an alternate universe. I feel Loder’s deadpan, trustworthy energy on every page. I can almost hear Turner’s blood rushing. I feel his tears and his ambition. by Karrine Steffans Confessions of a Video Vixen is deeply traumatized, but in 2006, when rap was enjoying one of its best years, Steffans shook the world with the hardcore intimacy of her life stories. There’s also the bodaciously crafted Rihanna’s Bookpublished by Phaidon Press in 2019, and 2006 Dirty Blonde: The Diaries of Courtney Love.

My Holiday Obsession Slight Billie
I start here with lady sings the blues by Holiday with William Duffy (1956) although in real life I started as a child with the 1972 film lady sings the blues with Diana Ross in the Oscar-nominated title role. I was too young to witness any heroin addiction, but film is a big part of why I love music and movies – and Billy Dee Williams. In the book, however, it’s Holiday’s written/spoken voice that seduces: melancholy, fearlessness and insecurity. A counterpart is that of John Szwed Billie Holiday: the musician and the myth (2015). He writes about Holiday’s relationship with the media and reviews the book lady sings the blues. There’s so many things, but right now, aside from his music, I’m in the 1998s Blues Legacy and Black Feminisms: Gertrude “Ma” Rainey, Bessie Smith and Billie Holiday by Angela Davis (1999) and Billie Holiday: Wishing on the Moon by Donald Clarke (1994).

My tactics are constantly changing. I cut back, I add. I lend (rarely!). I use my batteries for fun, for inspiration and for research. I’ve read books by and about women who make music – especially black women – not just because they’re under-celebrated and under-questioned, but because they’re the most interesting and most influential. We must know more and anticipate more, because we must do more, only to receive less credit and compensation. We are voice, story and prose. We sing truth to power.

And I didn’t even mention my stacks of Da Capo Hurry Better Music Writing collections or Alice Bag’s 2011 Violence Girl: East LA Rage to Hollywood Stage, a Chicana Punk Storyor 2020s She Come by It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs by Sarah Smarsh, or More Myself: A Journey by Alicia Keys, with Michelle Burford (2020), or the imposing 1992 I Hexed You: The Autobiography of Nina Simone, with Stephen Cleary. My batteries are leaning! They are not dusty, however, they shine. And to quote the late great Luther Vandross, there can never be too many.

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Hugh Jackman Quits The Music Man Shows After Covid-19 Diagnosis – Film News | Film-News.co.uk https://carolchanning.org/hugh-jackman-quits-the-music-man-shows-after-covid-19-diagnosis-film-news-film-news-co-uk/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 23:45:07 +0000 https://carolchanning.org/hugh-jackman-quits-the-music-man-shows-after-covid-19-diagnosis-film-news-film-news-co-uk/ Hugh Jackman will miss several performances of The Music Man after contracting Covid-19. The Wolverine star announced on Monday that due to his recent positive Covid-19 test result, he will not be portraying Professor Harold Hill in the musical between June 14 and June 21. Understudy Max Clayton will take on the role, starring in […]]]>

Hugh Jackman will miss several performances of The Music Man after contracting Covid-19.

The Wolverine star announced on Monday that due to his recent positive Covid-19 test result, he will not be portraying Professor Harold Hill in the musical between June 14 and June 21.

Understudy Max Clayton will take on the role, starring in Meredith Wilson’s musical alongside Sutton Foster this week.

“I was frustrated with the positive Covid test. Again. My replacement, the incredibly talented @maxmclayton will replace me,” Hugh wrote on Instagram. “The most annoying thing is that I can’t see him play! I’ve said it before and I’ll say it a million times more…Maxi and all the substitutes, swings and understudy around the world , you are the true hero of the theatre.You bring to life the saying “the show must go on”.

In an accompanying video, the actor assured fans, “Max and I have been working together on this show for over two years, and on this part, and I can tell you to be in the room with him and d experience, it is absolutely extraordinary.”

Music Man producer Kate Horton also issued a statement on the change, saying: “Once again, the watches and stunt doubles save the day and, in this case, it’s Max Clayton to the rescue. We are delighted to see him play alongside the wonderful Sutton Foster and wish Hugh a speedy recovery.”

Hugh’s diagnosis came hours after performing at the 2022 Tony Awards in New York with the cast of The Music Man. He was nominated for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical for his role, but lost to Myles Frost for MJ the Musical.

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Jennifer Hudson Wins EGOT After Tony’s ‘A Strange Loop’ Win https://carolchanning.org/jennifer-hudson-wins-egot-after-tonys-a-strange-loop-win/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 03:02:00 +0000 https://carolchanning.org/jennifer-hudson-wins-egot-after-tonys-a-strange-loop-win/ Jennifer Hudson achieved rarefied EGOT status with her Tony win for producing “A Strange Loop.” “EGOT” awards lingo refers to people who have won Emmys, Grammys, Oscars, and Tonys during their entertainment careers. Notable personalities who have won wins in all four awards bodies include Rita Moreno, Alan Menken, Andrew Lloyd Webber, John Legend, Mike […]]]>

Jennifer Hudson achieved rarefied EGOT status with her Tony win for producing “A Strange Loop.”

“EGOT” awards lingo refers to people who have won Emmys, Grammys, Oscars, and Tonys during their entertainment careers. Notable personalities who have won wins in all four awards bodies include Rita Moreno, Alan Menken, Andrew Lloyd Webber, John Legend, Mike Nichols, Mel Brooks and Whoopi Goldberg.

Only 16 individuals in history had earned an EGOT in competitive categories prior to tonight’s Tony Awards. Now Hudson is the 17th.

Hudson took the first steps toward getting EGOT with her Oscar win in the Best Supporting Actress category for her performance in “Dreamgirls” in 2006. Since then, Hudson has won two Grammys – one for Best Musical Theater Album for “The Color Purple” in 2017 and another for Best R&B Album for his self-titled album in 2009 – as well as a Daytime Emmy for executing the production of the VR-animated film “Baba Yaga “.

Coincidentally, this year’s ceremony for the 75th Tony Awards was hosted by fellow Oscar-winning supporting actress Ariana DeBose, who won the award this year for her performance in Steven Spielberg’s “West Side Story.”

“A Strange Loop” entered Sunday night’s awards show as an awards darling, gaining momentum from rave reviews and a passionate fan base. Michael R. Jackson’s Pulitzer winner led the pack, earning 11 nominations in all categories, including L Morgan Lee for Best Featured Actress in a Musical, making Lee the first transgender person to be nominated for a Tony.

See the full list of this year’s Tony winners here.

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AR Rahman hosts a musical wedding reception for his daughter Khatija in Chennai; Manisha Koirala and Yo Yo Honey Singh share photos and videos https://carolchanning.org/ar-rahman-hosts-a-musical-wedding-reception-for-his-daughter-khatija-in-chennai-manisha-koirala-and-yo-yo-honey-singh-share-photos-and-videos/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 04:48:06 +0000 https://carolchanning.org/ar-rahman-hosts-a-musical-wedding-reception-for-his-daughter-khatija-in-chennai-manisha-koirala-and-yo-yo-honey-singh-share-photos-and-videos/ Actor Manisha Koirala shared a photo with the bride and groom and wrote on Instagram, “Wedding reception for Mr. AR Rehman’s daughter Khatija was pure joy…meeting my colleagues from here m really warmed the heart!! This celebration added more to already many beautiful memories of #chennai!! God bless the newlyweds 🙏🏻💐❤️. Yo Yo Honey Singh […]]]>

Actor Manisha Koirala shared a photo with the bride and groom and wrote on Instagram, “Wedding reception for Mr. AR Rehman’s daughter Khatija was pure joy…meeting my colleagues from here m really warmed the heart!! This celebration added more to already many beautiful memories of #chennai!! God bless the newlyweds 🙏🏻💐❤.

Yo Yo Honey Singh was among the guests who attended the reception. He shared a photo with the newlyweds and wrote in an Instagram post, “Best wishes to the blessed couple and congratulations to all the family and fans of Mr. AR RAHMAN!!”

Sahil Khan and Sandip Singh also shared previews from Friday night’s reception. The author wrote: “At my favorite wedding AR Rahman @arrahman Sirs Daughters Wedding ❤.”

AR Rahman previously shared a beautiful video of his daughter’s wedding on May 5. He wrote: “Two united souls🌹🌺❤️‍🩹.”

Khatija shared the same video on Instagram and wrote, “With prayers and blessings from my grandparents and our families 🙏. On my big day (May 5th) with @riyasdeenriyan. This would not have been possible without the support of my family and my dear team ❤🙏.”

Khatija Rahman married sound engineer Riyasdeen Shaik Mohamad last month. Khatija, who is quite a private person, took to social media to make the announcement. Sharing a photo of her and her husband, she said: “The most anticipated day of my life. Married to my man. The two got engaged in January.

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IU Reveals She Has No “Immediate Plans” To Release New Music https://carolchanning.org/iu-reveals-she-has-no-immediate-plans-to-release-new-music/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 07:17:28 +0000 https://carolchanning.org/iu-reveals-she-has-no-immediate-plans-to-release-new-music/ IU shared that she is working on new music, although she currently has no plans to release anything soon. The South Korean singer and actress recently spoke with Korea JoongAng Daily on the next movie Broker, in which she plays the role of a single mother. The film recently premiered at the 2022 Cannes Film […]]]>

IU shared that she is working on new music, although she currently has no plans to release anything soon.

The South Korean singer and actress recently spoke with Korea JoongAng Daily on the next movie Broker, in which she plays the role of a single mother. The film recently premiered at the 2022 Cannes Film Festival, where it received a 12-minute standing ovation from the audience.

During the interview, IU opened up about whether she is working on the highly anticipated sequel to her 2021 album “Lilac.” “I’m writing something,” she said, before revealing that she has “no immediate plans to direct it.”

However, IU has given fans a hint as to what fans can expect from its next release. “It would be my first project since I was 30, so I want to do something different from what I did in my 20s,” she noted.

“I keep crossing things off my list – although it might be interesting, I think I’ve done something like this in the past, so I don’t know when I’ll be able to present my next songs” , she said. Explain. “I want to show a different perspective, a different story than what I’ve done before, in my next work.”

During a press conference at the Cannes Film Festival 2022, where Broker had been created, IU opened up about the difficulties she faced while playing the role of a mother for the first time. “It was hard portraying So-young because she was a mother with such a dark and depressing past,” she admitted.

Featuring a star-studded cast – including Song, Lee, IU, Bae Doo-na (The silent sea, Sense8) and Gang Dong-won (Peninsula) – Broker follows Sang-hyun, who sets up a baby box where parents can anonymously leave their babies to find him new parents.

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What it takes to invent a new musical instrument https://carolchanning.org/what-it-takes-to-invent-a-new-musical-instrument/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://carolchanning.org/what-it-takes-to-invent-a-new-musical-instrument/ Placeholder while loading article actions On a Sunday night in Los Angeles in 2011, composer and instrumentalist AR Rahman took to the stage in front of the gathered glitter and millions of other people watching the Oscars on television. Next, he and singer Florence Welch performed “If I Rise,” his Oscar-nominated song from the movie […]]]>
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On a Sunday night in Los Angeles in 2011, composer and instrumentalist AR Rahman took to the stage in front of the gathered glitter and millions of other people watching the Oscars on television. Next, he and singer Florence Welch performed “If I Rise,” his Oscar-nominated song from the movie “127 Hours.” On the other end of the telecast, on a television station in rural Maryland, Tim Meeks was setting himself up for overnight success.

When he heard about Rahman’s upcoming performance – spotlighting in prime time the musical instrument that Meeks had invented and started selling in 2007, a piano-guitar hybrid called the harpejji – he had enlisted a few friends to help him manage the phones the next day. “But that’s not how it works,” Meeks told me. The anticipated run on the harpejjis – perhaps by curious musicians – did not take place. That didn’t materialize even when Stevie Wonder performed “Superstition” on a harpejji (pronounced har-PEH-gee) in 2012 at the Billboard Music Awards. Or in 2015, when he performed “Ain’t No Sunshine” at Bill Withers’ Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction. It was going to take more time, more patience.

But now the new instrument, made by the family business, Marcodi Musical Products, headquartered in the basement of Meeks’ home in Glen Arm, Maryland, has seen sales increase. The company has sold around 500 harpejjis since 2019, the same number sold in the previous 12 years combined – no doubt helped by the continued exposure and public adoration of Wonder, as well as musicians like Harry Connick Jr., who played a harpejji last year. the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree lighting and British prodigy Jacob Collier, who used his to serenade 1.5 million Instagram followers.

The harpejji, which sells for $3,000 to $6,000, is long, flat and electrified, with strings stretched over frets along a wooden body. Below them are black and white markers that correspond to the notes on a piano. Horizontally, the notes run in whole tones; vertically they are halftone. A note sounds only when a string touches a fret, and this is done with any number of fingers at once. These active strings can also be bent, shaken or strummed.

Meeks, a keyboardist, was looking for a more expressive way to play without giving up his piano prowess. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, he came across the work of inventors exploring stringed instruments, such as Emmett Chapman’s Chapman Stick and John Starrett’s StarrBoard. The latter was close to Meeks’ vision, and he bought one of Starrett’s prototypes and started tinkering. When the only remaining original piece was wood, a new iteration arose, Meeks says, and he has five patents related to its design and technical components.

“The harpejji is kind of a progressive thing,” he told me. He is not the first to mention this combination, but this particular body design and this set of modifications “just work for musicians.

Musical innovations often stem from hybridization, says Krystal Klingenberg, music curator at the National Museum of American History. Since they’re created to solve a problem, “instruments don’t just follow these linear progressions of development,” she told me. “There are all these little ramifications of potential for this and potential for that.”

Even instruments that may seem static over the past century or two are constantly evolving to pursue sonic or utilitarian ambitions or enduring materials, says Arian Sheets, curator of stringed instruments at the National Music Museum in Vermillion, SD She points to the trumpet from the museum collection, which is a set of fun and mirrored horns, including a jazzophone, a saxophone-shaped trumpet with two bells.

Adaptations are mostly for a few lucky parents, but sometimes become commonplace. Klingenberg and Sheets cite technological breakthroughs like the electric guitar, the Moog synthesizer, and the hip-hop reinvention of the turntable.

The harpejji began to intrigue Meeks’ friends, and he decided to go into business. He had a certain know-how: at that time, he was developing consumer products for Polk Audio. What he had less was time and money. He and his wife, Joy, a singer, were building a family of what are now six children, ages 23 to 8, and Joy took on the brunt of the household chores while Meeks, 49, could see this through.

Early on, the harpejji rose to prominence in YouTube videos with Jordan Rudess of progressive metal band Dream Theater. Then Stevie Wonder found Meeks at a trade show in January 2012, and soon after, Meeks and Joy traveled to Los Angeles to deliver Wonder’s harpejji. They spent three days with him while he learned to play. “We were eating chicken and waffles — just sitting at a table eating chicken and waffles with Stevie Wonder,” Meeks recalled with lingering amazement.

It was at Wonder’s fingertips that Jacob Collier first saw the instrument in a video. “I was a little puzzled and puzzled, because I had never seen anything like it before,” the 27-year-old, five-time Grammy winner told me. Learning the harpejji at the end of 2019 was a “rare treat” for its novelty – it was an instrument that Collier had not already heard countless others play – but also for the uniqueness of its layout, the fingering of the chords and shift patterns through them. “Another thing that really blew my mind,” he says, “is after introducing it to [my musical] regime, I found myself playing new piano and guitar stuff because… the logic of it had unlocked this new kind of system.

In 2016, Meeks quit his job to run Marcodi full-time. Joy now takes care of customer service and sales, working alongside four of their children and two other store employees. As of 2020, Meeks has served as both managing director of Marcodi and president of Wingard, a metal parts maker in Baltimore.

Later that year they move to a house nearby that will triple the size of the workshop. Meeks has ideas for other products, including effects pedals. And the harpejji is no more static than any other instrument. Like the music itself, it continues to evolve.

Danny Freedman is a journalist in Memphis.

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MTV Movie and TV Awards Live Stream: How to Watch https://carolchanning.org/mtv-movie-and-tv-awards-live-stream-how-to-watch/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://carolchanning.org/mtv-movie-and-tv-awards-live-stream-how-to-watch/ The 2022 MTV Movie and TV Awards are almost here. This year’s ceremony will air live on June 5 at 8 p.m. ET/PT from the Barker Hangar in Los Angeles, hosted by Vanessa Hudgens. Additionally, this year’s awards will air alongside the companion show “MTV Movie and TV Awards: Unscripted,” which airs at 10 p.m. […]]]>

The 2022 MTV Movie and TV Awards are almost here. This year’s ceremony will air live on June 5 at 8 p.m. ET/PT from the Barker Hangar in Los Angeles, hosted by Vanessa Hudgens. Additionally, this year’s awards will air alongside the companion show “MTV Movie and TV Awards: Unscripted,” which airs at 10 p.m. ET/PT, with awards specifically focused on reality and competition series.

Both shows will of course air on MTV in over 170 countries, in addition to simulcasting on BET, BET Her, CMT, Comedy Central, Logo, MTV2, Nick at Nite, Paramount Network, Pop, TV Land and VH1. For those unable to attend the live stream, the full ceremony will be available after its completion on the MTV app.

After the 2020 awards were canceled due to the pandemic, MTV premiered a new special, “MTV Movie and TV Awards: Greatest of All Time”, in December 2020, also hosted by Hudgens. The special paid homage to the best moments in TV and film with irreverent award names and memorable performances, and the 2021 awards – hosted by comedian Leslie Jones – took place over two days to make up for lost time. The “unscripted” portion of the show debuted in 2021 and is returning this year.

MTV also announced last week that Jack Black would receive the Comedic Genius Award at the ceremony, making him the fifth recipient of the award to date.

Executive producers for the MTV Movie and TV Awards and “Unscripted” are MTV’s Bruce Gillmer, Wendy Plaut and Vanessa WhiteWolf, and Den Of Thieves’ Jesse Ignjatovic and Barb Bialkowski. Jackie Barba and Alicia Portugal are the executives in charge of production, and Lisa Lauricella is the musical talent director for both events.

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