Film musical – Carol Channing http://carolchanning.org/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 08:53:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://carolchanning.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-29T131401.023-150x150.png Film musical – Carol Channing http://carolchanning.org/ 32 32 The Shuffle: The Return of the Musical | The mixture http://carolchanning.org/the-shuffle-the-return-of-the-musical-the-mixture/ http://carolchanning.org/the-shuffle-the-return-of-the-musical-the-mixture/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 04:45:00 +0000 http://carolchanning.org/the-shuffle-the-return-of-the-musical-the-mixture/ In 2009, Hugh Jackman proclaimed loud and clear at the Oscars that “The Musical is Back!” At the time, it made sense. That year, the film version of “Mamma Mia!” was a resounding success and the popular “High School Musical” series closed its series with “High School Musical 3: Senior Year”. There was reason to […]]]>

In 2009, Hugh Jackman proclaimed loud and clear at the Oscars that “The Musical is Back!”

At the time, it made sense. That year, the film version of “Mamma Mia!” was a resounding success and the popular “High School Musical” series closed its series with “High School Musical 3: Senior Year”. There was reason to be optimistic.

What followed Jackson’s proclamation was a series of exaggerated flops: “Nine”, “Burlesque”, “Rock of Ages” and “Jersey Boys”, with a few hits like “Les Misérables” and “The Greatest Showman” by Jackman. For the most part, the musical was not back.

That hasn’t stopped Hollywood from trying to bring the genre back in full force, especially in 2021. “In The Heights” remains one of my favorite movies of the year. Steven Spielberg’s adaptation of “West Side Story” is looming on the horizon. In the meantime, three musicals have been released recently, with varying results. Let’s see how they are doing.

“Dear Evan Hansen” (PG-13, in theaters Friday) – The stage version of Tony’s winning smash was funny, inventive, and energetic. Even though his take on mental health is extremely problematic, and his central storyline is creepy and bordering on evil, you could forgive him because of his catchy songs and Ben Platt’s incredible, edgy performance.

As a movie, it doesn’t work at all. All the energy has been zapped, replaced by a dripping melodrama and an icy rhythm. While Platt’s voice still skyrockets, he sounds like an undercover adult in high school. As a grieving and grieving mother, the permanent smile on Amy Adams face is baffling.

It has become an easy target for critics as there is a lot of wrong and I would like to give it the benefit of the doubt. But the many glaring issues, from its bland colors to its inability to switch from dialogue to song and bloated runtime, make it impossible to recommend.

“Come from afar” (Now playing on Apple TV +) – Originally slated to be a film version of the popular musical, COVID restrictions forced the original cast and director to decide whether to shoot the performance live instead. It’s better this way.

Capturing the intricate choreography, sparse staging, and costume changes for this small cast, playing multiple characters in this musical about passengers stranded in Canada during September 11, it’s a prime example of why more musicals , including “Dear Evan Hansen”, should simply shoot the performance live instead of turning it into a movie.

“Cinderella (2021)” (PG. Now playing on Amazon Prime Video) – It’s a disaster. But it’s a fun disaster, so it’s worth the trip. Written and directed by Kay Cannon (“Pitch Perfect”), it’s pretty much the “Pitch Perfect” version of the classic story, right down to mashups, jukebox music songs and Camila Cabello as a star. Very few things work as expected. But the cast, which includes Pierce Brosnan, Minnie Driver, and Billy Porter, seem to be having fun, and that goes a long way to making it tolerable.


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Robert Bresson’s A Man Escaped uses editing to create spiritual film http://carolchanning.org/robert-bressons-a-man-escaped-uses-editing-to-create-spiritual-film/ http://carolchanning.org/robert-bressons-a-man-escaped-uses-editing-to-create-spiritual-film/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:00:00 +0000 http://carolchanning.org/robert-bressons-a-man-escaped-uses-editing-to-create-spiritual-film/ The end of A man escaped is revealed in the title. The film is an escape drama, and yet the viewer knows that entering it “a man has escaped”. If this is any indication, it is the work of a filmmaker with no regard for convention. This filmmaker is Robert Bresson, whose films are so […]]]>

The end of A man escaped is revealed in the title. The film is an escape drama, and yet the viewer knows that entering it “a man has escaped”. If this is any indication, it is the work of a filmmaker with no regard for convention. This filmmaker is Robert Bresson, whose films are so unique that they are often considered unprecedented. He designed his own personal style for his own personal reasons, and the years 1956 A man escaped delves deeper into this style than any of his previous work. Bresson considered himself an ascetic, and he might well have been the father of the minimal film. While Hollywood always seems to strive to show more, the French director has strived to show less. A man escaped is painstakingly thrifty in terms of storytelling, visuals, and acting, but manages to tell a powerful and tense story of the way everything is cut out.

Bresson’s films are so different from standard narrative films because he rejected anything he considered too dependent on other artistic mediums. His goal was to develop a stand-alone version of cinema, without the over-the-top acting of theater, the consciously “pretty” visuals of painting, the heavy plots of literature or the manipulation of a constant musical score. One thing he considered native to cinema was the editing. The ability to cut from one subject to another, to build a flow of meaning and emotion through a carefully chosen flow of images, is really only possible in film. Thus in Bresson’s films, every element except the editing is reduced. No aspect on the screen is allowed to overwhelm the whole, and the power of a work comes only from the interplay of images and sounds, as they are reconstructed in the assembly in general.

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So how does this happen in A man escaped? The story itself is very simple, based on a single goal. It follows Fontaine, a Frenchman imprisoned by the Nazis during World War II, as he slowly and methodically plans and stages his escape. It’s not overly dramatized. There are no extreme highs and lows. It is presented as a fact, with an opening title stating that it is based on actual events (namely the escape of a French resistance fighter André Devigny, but also Bresson’s own experiences as a prisoner of war during World War II), and the only dramatic tension is that which naturally arises from the scenes he portrays, without stylistic enhancement. The characters in Bresson’s films have neither psychology nor history. All the viewer knows about them is what can be deduced from their behavior, and Fontaine reveals himself as a deeply determined man, unshakeable by the despair that surrounds him. He is represented by Francois Leterrier, a non-actor who exemplifies Bresson’s approach to playing as well as anyone in his films. Bresson often used non-actors and called them “models”. With a contempt for authoritarian theatricality, the director attempted to suppress all emotion from the faces and voices of his actors. In many cases, it would demand take after take until the actor is too exhausted to deliver anything other than a direct line reading. Fontaine usually glares around his prison cell with little to no expression, and his speech to fellow inmates hums in a monotonous, lifeless tone.

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The cinematography of the film, typical of Bresson’s work, is equally flat. He films his subjects live, without stylized lighting. Camera movements are light, and only work to track character actions. There are no grandiose prison plans, nor quick glimpses of the affairs of other inmates. Things remain very intimate with Fontaine’s personal experience, with the film dominated by close-ups of his face and hands, as well as shots from his point of view. Likewise, there is very little music in the film. It serves to set the mood during the opening credits and to bridge the scenes, but never to guide the action itself. The sounds, although minimal, often evoke invisible things. A passing train is heard continuously from Fontaine’s cell, but is not shown once.

All this restraint leads to the story being largely shaped by the editing. Each shot essentially reduces its subject to an abstraction, meaningless in itself, but forged in the essence of the action by juxtaposition with the following shots. This is well illustrated by the opening scene of the film. Fontaine is carried in the back of a police car, when he decides to try to jump out the side door. His choice to flee the vehicle and the inner tension that this arouses are communicated entirely through the cutting. A photo shows his face, staring blankly at the driver of the car. Another shot is his perspective of the driver, who is too distracted by the road ahead to notice anything Fontaine might be doing. A third shot is a close-up of Fontaine’s hand, very gently approaching the handle of his door. These shots do not express anything on their own, and no music or style causes the viewer to superficially feel Fontaine’s tension, but Bresson goes back and forth between the three angles repeatedly until the intentions and character anxiety are apparent. When Fontaine makes his gesture, the attentive spectator fully expects it, having made the right connections from shot to shot to enter the protagonist’s tense headspace. This technique is used throughout the film and helps the viewer in Fontaine’s struggle, if he is willing to take that leap.

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The technique has a name: the Kuleshov effect. Invented in the age of silence by Lev Kulechov, it refers to how several images, unpretentious in themselves, can be given a load when they collide with each other during editing. This technique is often applied to assembly theory, but A man escaped does not contain any montage. The montages construct cutout scenes while showing the viewer how to feel what they are seeing through extreme flourishes of music and style. When Bresson uses Kuleshov’s technique detached from any exaggerated stylization, the viewer is not guided through the film by manipulation, but is entrusted with the responsibility of instilling in the images themselves a meaning, as determined by the placement. of each shot in relation to the others. While requiring more of the viewer, it arguably creates something of greater lasting power in Fontaine’s journey to freedom than would otherwise be the case in a traditionally manipulative film. Without being made to feel for him superficially, the viewer must stand up to understand his situation for himself, given only the narrative information needed by the montage. For viewers able to achieve this, the film can reach almost spiritual heights.

A man escaped is a deeply spiritual film, and that serves to explain why Bresson spoils his ending in the title. A subtitle for the film is The wind blows where it wants, and as it might suggest, the film is about predestination. Moments of grace permeate the film, the materials necessary for Fontaine’s escape seeming to fall to his knees by sheer chance. The feeling arises that he was always destined to escape, and as he sometimes sinks into despair, his faith in the idea is questioned alongside that of the audience. The austere style denies any sense of easy security, and the editing, while guiding the audience through abstractions, leaves entirely up to the viewer how to approach the story on an emotional level. Indeed, the shooting puts to the test the faith of the spectator in Fountain to realize the escape. Bresson is often considered the most witty of all filmmakers, and A man escaped, aside from its exhilarating and powerful story, is ultimately a test of faith.

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Jerome Indie Film and Music Festival scheduled for September 23-26 http://carolchanning.org/jerome-indie-film-and-music-festival-scheduled-for-september-23-26/ http://carolchanning.org/jerome-indie-film-and-music-festival-scheduled-for-september-23-26/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 22:06:45 +0000 http://carolchanning.org/jerome-indie-film-and-music-festival-scheduled-for-september-23-26/ Ranked one of the 25 coolest film festivals in the world in 2017 by MovieMaker magazine, the eighth annual Jerome independent film and music festival is scheduled to take place Thursday through Sunday, September 23-26, according to a press release. . Set in America’s largest ghost town, the Jerome Indie Film and Music Festival looks […]]]>

Ranked one of the 25 coolest film festivals in the world in 2017 by MovieMaker magazine, the eighth annual Jerome independent film and music festival is scheduled to take place Thursday through Sunday, September 23-26, according to a press release. .

Set in America’s largest ghost town, the Jerome Indie Film and Music Festival looks for new ways to “surprise our guests” each year.

“We are nervous, unexpected and always looking for ways to surprise our guests,” said Toni Ross, spokesperson for the film festival. “Every year, we look for ups and downs all over Jérôme to show independent films in the most unexpected places. We screened films on a train, in a haunted gold mine, inside vineyards, in surprise residences on top of a hill, in the basement hallway of a century-old high school and in the interior of rustic buildings throughout Jérôme.

For the eighth edition of the Jerome Indie Film and Music Festival, guests will be presented with several new and extraordinary events including the Bartlett Concert and the Liberty Theater Showcase where Sweetwater Strings will perform ACDC, Led Zeppelin and other metallic sounds on their strings. They will also perform iconic film themes.

Guests will then head to the Liberty Theater to watch a short presentation of independent films. Virgin Cheese, the film festival’s new partner, will be offering decadent cheeses to guests of this event and desserts will be provided after the short film is shown inside the Liberty Theater.

EXCEPTIONAL EVENT

The festival hosts the first Mad Hatter Tea Party on Sunday September 26 in a Jerome Secret Garden where guests can enjoy live music while enjoying sandwiches, mouth-watering cheeses provided by Virgin Cheese, decadent desserts and of course spectacular teas. Guests are encouraged to wear Mad Hatter themed outfits or don a funky hat.

FIRE STORM

A special showing on Saturday September 25 is “Firestorm ’77”. Verde Valley firefighters are invited to this screening for free, plus a 0 guest. Survivors of the fire will lead a panel after the film.

Film synopsis: A combination of hurricane-force winds and the slamming of a utility pole sets off the Honda Canyon fire at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., In the early morning hours of December 20, 1977. Over a thousand people made up professional firefighters and military personnel fighting the fire. The aberrant winds would increase to over a hundred miles an hour, making the shooting almost impossible.

FEAR US

As everyone knows, Jerome is known as America’s greatest ghost town and fans of horror and suspense will surely be delighted to see “Scare Us”, which will be screened inside the Liberty Theater on Saturday. September 25.

Synopsis: A spooky horror anthology comprising five short stories, written by an unlikely group of budding writers, in Sugarton – a small town plagued by the apparent return of an infamous serial killer, nicknamed “Cutthroat”. They have come to share their spooky stories (with each other and with the owner of the bookstore, Peter, who runs the group), but soon find out that they have become the stars of the twisted story of a sick killer.

TRAIN EVENT

We can’t forget to talk about the film festival’s flagship event, the Wicked Wild West Cinema Train, which this year is sponsored by El Toreo Mexican Food Restaurant in Clarkdale.

Customers who purchase this pass will enjoy a four-hour train ride during which they listen to live music performed by Scott Jeffers in the exterior car, followed by a short presentation of films about the interior car.

Moviemaker Magazine chose the Jerome Indie Film & Music Festival as one of the coolest film festivals in the world in 2017 and cited the train as one of the main reasons. No other film festival in the world shows films on a train.

The train departs from the Verde Canyon Railroad on Saturday, September 25 at 1 p.m.

“We encourage anyone who takes the train to dine at El Toreo after delicious Mexican food and the best margaritas in the Verde Valley,” said Ross.

TICKETS

This year, the festival’s founders decided to cut the cost of single tickets by 50%, including all the financial hardship COVID-19 has caused over the past year and a half. Single tickets now cost only $ 8.

“We really want to encourage people to go out and soak up the culture while saving money,” Ross said.

As always, residents of Jerome, Clarkdale, Cottonwood, Cornville and Camp Verde receive 25% off Saloon, Cowboy and Blacksmith passes with proof of residency.

Tickets are now on sale at jeromefilmfestival.com.

VOLUNTEER

The festival is looking for local volunteers. Anyone interested, please contact Doreen at doreen.jeromefilmfestival@gmail.com. Our volunteers always have a great time volunteering and becoming members of our festival, but they also enjoy many benefits, including free.

Information provided by the Jerome Indie Film and Music Festival.


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The Return of Mad Dogs & Englishmen movie release http://carolchanning.org/the-return-of-mad-dogs-englishmen-movie-release/ http://carolchanning.org/the-return-of-mad-dogs-englishmen-movie-release/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 10:48:16 +0000 http://carolchanning.org/the-return-of-mad-dogs-englishmen-movie-release/ Abramorama has acquired the distribution rights for Jesse Lauter’s musical documentary Learning to live together: the return of the madmen and the English. An electrifying music-filled documentary highlighting the famous “Mad Dogs & Englishmen” Joe cocker short tour featuring a gigantic band of thirty musicians, told through the lens of reuniting the remaining 12 band […]]]>

Abramorama has acquired the distribution rights for Jesse Lauter’s musical documentary Learning to live together: the return of the madmen and the English.

An electrifying music-filled documentary highlighting the famous “Mad Dogs & Englishmen” Joe cocker short tour featuring a gigantic band of thirty musicians, told through the lens of reuniting the remaining 12 band members 45 years later to perform with Grammy Award winning Tedeschi Trucks at the Lockn ‘Festival.

The film features archive footage as well as current performances and interviews with Leon Russell, Derek Trucks, Susan Tedeschi, Rita Coolidge, Chris Robinson, Jim Keltner, Dave Mason, Claudia Lennear and many more.

Filmmaker Jesse Lauter said: “The original Mad Dogs & Englishmen album and documentary played a fundamental role in my early years as a music producer and musician. There has always been a shroud of mystery around this tour – how it happened, how it was, why it never happened again – so I felt it was my duty to reveal the the truth, the beauty and yes the drama, behind the music, hoping to find out why this music has resonated for so many generations. It has been the greatest honor of my career to capture this once in a lifetime reunion. ”

Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks added, “Mad Dogs & Englishmen was one of the groups that inspired us when we started our group and paying tribute to their work with so many original members was a highlight on many levels. This film is a labor of love that has been brewing for many years, and we take great pride in sharing the music and stories of the men and women of Mad Dogs & Englishmen.

In the spring of 1970, Joe Cocker undertook what would become the legendary “Mad Dogs and Englishmen” tour, immortalized in a live album and concert film. Fifty years later, first-time filmmaker Jesse Lauter tells the full story through the lens of the Grammy Award-winning Tedeschi Trucks’ Mad Dogs reunion.

In addition to Derek Trucks, Susan Tedeschi and the entire Tedeschi Trucks group, this reunion brought together 12 of the original Mad Dogs, including Leon Russell, Rita Coolidge and Claudia Lennear, as well as guest artists Chris Robinson and Dave Mason, between others.

The film features performances inspired by the reunion show, as well as an exclusive look at the tour’s history and unpublished archival material, commentary from the original members, critic David Fricke, notable fans who attended. to the shows of the original tour and features the last filmed interview with the late Leon Russell.

Richard Abramowitz, CEO of Abramorama, said: “Jesse Lauter has woven a seamless fabric of excellent live music and insightful and often hilarious anecdotes into a film that honors the past while being firmly grounded in the present. We have worked on many musical films over the years and this one immediately found its place among the best.

Buy or stream the Mad and English dogs soundtrack.


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LSU will prepare for the sound of Mississippi State football crowd with music http://carolchanning.org/lsu-will-prepare-for-the-sound-of-mississippi-state-football-crowd-with-music/ http://carolchanning.org/lsu-will-prepare-for-the-sound-of-mississippi-state-football-crowd-with-music/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 18:52:58 +0000 http://carolchanning.org/lsu-will-prepare-for-the-sound-of-mississippi-state-football-crowd-with-music/ STARKVILLE – As LSU football tries to mend last season’s loss to Mississippi State when the Tigers visit Davis Wade Stadium, much of the preparation has nothing to do with passing coverage. Instead, LSU video director Doug Aucoin will stack large speakers on a cart, head out to the training ground, and position himself – […]]]>

STARKVILLE – As LSU football tries to mend last season’s loss to Mississippi State when the Tigers visit Davis Wade Stadium, much of the preparation has nothing to do with passing coverage.

Instead, LSU video director Doug Aucoin will stack large speakers on a cart, head out to the training ground, and position himself – and those speakers – just behind the quarterbacks. . Then he’ll kick off the game, blowing up anything on the playlist to mimic the environment the Tigers will face in Starkville on Saturday (11 a.m., ESPN).

“We’re going to be playing music all week,” Orgeron said. “They have these really loud speakers over there. Their fans are involved. It’s gonna be 11 in the morning, we’re gonna have to wake our guys up and go. This is a challenge. They ring those bells and it’s one of the loudest stadiums we’re going to play.


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Love Story: AR Rahman Sends Best Wishes to Music Director Pawan Ch and Film Crew | News of the film in Telugu http://carolchanning.org/love-story-ar-rahman-sends-best-wishes-to-music-director-pawan-ch-and-film-crew-news-of-the-film-in-telugu/ http://carolchanning.org/love-story-ar-rahman-sends-best-wishes-to-music-director-pawan-ch-and-film-crew-news-of-the-film-in-telugu/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 10:10:00 +0000 http://carolchanning.org/love-story-ar-rahman-sends-best-wishes-to-music-director-pawan-ch-and-film-crew-news-of-the-film-in-telugu/ It’s been a while since Akkineni Naga Chaitanya and Sai Pallavi made the headlines of their upcoming movie “Love Story”. The film is among the highly anticipated releases and fans have been eagerly awaiting all updates on the film. To add to their excitement, the creators hosted a pre-release event on Sunday, and megastar Chiranjeevi […]]]>
It’s been a while since Akkineni Naga Chaitanya and Sai Pallavi made the headlines of their upcoming movie “Love Story”. The film is among the highly anticipated releases and fans have been eagerly awaiting all updates on the film. To add to their excitement, the creators hosted a pre-release event on Sunday, and megastar Chiranjeevi made her presence felt at the event. One of the highlights of the event is the idol’s shaking leg in the morning with Sai Pallavi.

Oscar-winning music composer AR Rahman sent his best wishes to Love Story’s team and Music Director, Pawan Ch. The creators shared a video of his wishes on their official Twitter account. “I wanted to wish the very talented Pawan much success and love for people and good luck with the movie Love Story and its soundtrack. Good luck Naga Chaitanya, Sai Pallavi, Sekhar Kammula and everyone, ” Rahman said in a video.

Naga Chaitanya plays Revanth while Sai Pallavi tries out the role of Mounica. The trailer, which released on September 13, has garnered over 8 million views on YouTube. It also stars Devayani, Rao Ramesh, Posani Krishna Murali, Rajeev Kanakala, Easwari Rao, Satyam Rajesh, Tagubothu Ramesh and Uttej in key roles. Funded by Amigos Creations and Sree Venkateswara Cinemas, the film hits theaters on September 24.



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Lord of the Rings film composer reportedly in talks for Amazon Show http://carolchanning.org/lord-of-the-rings-film-composer-reportedly-in-talks-for-amazon-show/ http://carolchanning.org/lord-of-the-rings-film-composer-reportedly-in-talks-for-amazon-show/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 16:27:00 +0000 http://carolchanning.org/lord-of-the-rings-film-composer-reportedly-in-talks-for-amazon-show/ The original Lord of the Rings trilogy composer Howard Shore is reportedly in talks to return to compose for the upcoming Amazon LotR series. Howard Shore, the composer of Peter Jackson the Lord of the Rings film trilogy, is reportedly in talks to return for the next Amazon series. Shore’s musical contributions to Jackson’s films […]]]>

The original Lord of the Rings trilogy composer Howard Shore is reportedly in talks to return to compose for the upcoming Amazon LotR series.

Howard Shore, the composer of Peter Jackson the Lord of the Rings film trilogy, is reportedly in talks to return for the next Amazon series. Shore’s musical contributions to Jackson’s films are a big part of what made them successful, as evidenced by the composer’s three Oscars for his work on the trilogy. Shore returned to the franchise to collaborate with Jackson again on his film adaptations of The Hobbit.

In a movie franchise as massive as the Lord of the Rings, no one person or aspect of the production can fully explain the success of a film. A lot of different things had to come together for Jackson’s the Lord of the Rings movies for success, breathtaking panoramas of New Zealand and the incredibly talented set of stars with groundbreaking special effects and captivating production design. Although this is entirely a group effort, no individual but Jackson himself deserves more credit for the Lord of the Rings than Shore, who crafted a hauntingly beautiful score for each film, firmly establishing the energy and feeling of Middle-earth for millions of viewers.


Related: What Elijah Wood Has Been Doing Since Lord Of The Rings

Now, it looks like Shore is once again returning to Tolkien’s fantasy world. Through Deadline, the composer is said to be in talks to return to the franchise on Amazon and compose music for the upcoming the Lord of the Rings prequel show. Season 1 of the series, which is said to have cost a record $ 465 million to produce, is scheduled to stream on Amazon Prime Video on September 2, 2022.

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For a show that seems to share very little DNA with the Jackson movies, bringing Shore back could be a big step in getting fans of the movies tune in. The series takes place during the Second Age of Middle-earth, long before the events of The Fellowship of the Ring. This means that the show will focus almost entirely on new characters and locations. As such, Shore’s music would be a welcome dose of familiarity to pair with anything new to the series.

With the biggest budget ever for a single television season in history, Amazon the Lord of the Rings the show has a lot to do. The studio has already ordered a second season as well, which will go into pre-production in January 2022, months before Season 1 releases to the public. All in all, the new the Lord of the Rings the series appears to be an important and expensive experiment in modern television production, and the addition of Shore as the series’ composer could ensure that at least part of it will live up to its promises.

Next: How Amazon’s Lord of the Rings TV Show Sets Up A Worst Villain Than Sauron

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In the Heights is a decent musical adaptation, but a great summer movie http://carolchanning.org/in-the-heights-is-a-decent-musical-adaptation-but-a-great-summer-movie/ http://carolchanning.org/in-the-heights-is-a-decent-musical-adaptation-but-a-great-summer-movie/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 22:10:42 +0000 http://carolchanning.org/in-the-heights-is-a-decent-musical-adaptation-but-a-great-summer-movie/ In the Heights improves and falls short of the source material, but the end product is still perfectly suited for summer 2021. For a year now, lovers of musicals have been waiting, with patience and faith as Abuela would say, for the release of In the heights. Lin-Manuel Miranda’s film adaptation of the premiereHamilton The […]]]>

In the Heights improves and falls short of the source material, but the end product is still perfectly suited for summer 2021.

For a year now, lovers of musicals have been waiting, with patience and faith as Abuela would say, for the release of In the heights. Lin-Manuel Miranda’s film adaptation of the premiereHamilton The Broadway hit was scheduled to air on June 26, 2020, but was delayed due to COVID-19. While the answer probably wouldn’t have been drastically different anyway, it’s easier to appreciate. In the heights now. After 16 months of shared fears, frustrations, and disappointments as Broadway darkened, Miranda’s modest and serious but relentlessly cheerful and hopeful story seems relevant in a new and unexpected way. In the heights isn’t a perfect or even particularly well-thought-out adaptation of a musical, but it’s a great summer movie nonetheless, and particularly apt for the summer of 2021.


While the filmed production of Hamilton who lives on Disney + is as close to seeing the original cast as one can get for $ 7.99, the In the heights is most definitely its own thing. Director Jon M. Chu, best known for Crazy Rich Asians, makes choices that improve the source material and others that seem to lose track. For most of Hollywood history, musicals like The sound of music and West Side Story have been redone quite simply (and have generally won many awards). In recent years, directors have tried to impose framing devices and other gadgets on them, to make the breaking of the belts and the fourth wall more believable. Sometimes it works (Chicago), sometimes not (Cats). In the heights half-heartedly attempts such a framing device, and unfortunately the accompanying one is quite cliché. Usnavi, the protagonist, begins and ends the film by telling his story to a group of incredibly attentive children.

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From there, things start to become more familiar to anyone who has had the pleasure of seeing the stage production. Chu’s films frequently feature dance, and without the constraints of a proscenium, the choreography is free to be as exuberant and festive as possible. Beautifully composed aerial shots make all of the movement easier to capture, while sweaty close-ups make everything more human and tactile. It’s a tricky trick to pull off. The same goes for retaining the sense of urgency and ever-increasing tension that theatergoers feel about real time and space. In this regard, In the heights is random.

The show should stay on its corner, but the film has the freedom to explore the entire neighborhood, inside and out. Chu does an admirable job bringing the Usnavi bodega, Daniela’s living room and Abuela’s apartment to life. There is a realism and, more importantly, an intimacy in these scenes that cannot pass from the perspective of even a front row house seat. Corn In the heights really sing and dance when he takes the block, park or pool, with 500 enthusiastic extras to get the party started. Manuel’s clearly very personal play is as much about time and place as it is about the people who live then and there, and the film does that idea justice. It looks, sounds, tastes, smells and feels like summer in Washington Heights so specifically and intensely that you’ll want to step out of the multiplex to light a pipe, blow up a radio, and throw ice in a blender.

It should also be noted that while plays and films about black and Latin communities previously existed In the heights, they didn’t always sound authentic, and their castings didn’t always include the people they sought to represent. Some observers familiar with the film’s titular quarter have expressed frustration that it is still insufficient, especially in its lack of proportional Afro-Latinx representation. Yet the diversity and pride displayed in In the heights Distinguishes it from most of what came before it, as does the representation of working class families, which completely avoids exploitation. Overall, many people will recognize themselves in this more accessible version of Miranda’s art, and in the performances of Anthony Ramos and the company, which are as tender as they are technically impressive. Olga Merediz as Abuela Claudia is the star and will be a serious contender for the Supporting Actress Awards.

Anthony Ramos and Melissa Barrera from In the Heights

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In the heights fails to manage the plot, which shouldn’t come as a big surprise, as plot was never the stronghold of the musical. The original – which ostensibly deals with what young children in love are going to do with their lives, but actually deals with gentrification and the intricacies of racism – was already a little curvy but overloaded. The film, with its ability to focus its audience, could have tightened things up. It’s certainly a revision with major character and event changes, but it’s not a very bold or focused change. Most tinkering only decreases the tension, lowers the stakes, and slows the pace. In particular, the addition of a new subplot involving the potential deportation of Dreamers is well-intentioned but nailed in place. Ultimately, In the heights plays more like a truly fantastic 2.5-hour music video that doesn’t quite reach the heights it aspires to.

This is even more true because Miranda and Chu didn’t seem to make any firm and quick decisions about the realism or impressionism of the final product. About half of the film favors naturalism, while the other half embraces the kind of magic that allows gravity-defying dance numbers to stand on the sides of tall buildings. But it’s good. Point of In the heights isn’t really about telling a story. The aim is to remind ourselves of our dignity and the dignity of others, and to cherish the people and everyday things that give meaning to our lives. Whether you experience it in the comfort of your home on HBO Max, or in the comfort of an air-conditioned theater with – after all this time – a crowd, this is the perfect way to start your summer and reignite your optimism. .

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Streaming Weekend: “The Neon Bible,” a Coming of Age Tale Amidst Music and Horror http://carolchanning.org/streaming-weekend-the-neon-bible-a-coming-of-age-tale-amidst-music-and-horror/ http://carolchanning.org/streaming-weekend-the-neon-bible-a-coming-of-age-tale-amidst-music-and-horror/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 00:07:44 +0000 http://carolchanning.org/streaming-weekend-the-neon-bible-a-coming-of-age-tale-amidst-music-and-horror/ Director Terence Davies turns “The Neon Bible” into a personal story by ricochet, a vision of American culture that has refined and broadened his own youthful sensibility. British director Terence Davies, whose films combine style with emotion both exquisitely and inventively, is also one of the great autobiographers of cinema. His third feature film, “The […]]]>
Director Terence Davies turns “The Neon Bible” into a personal story by ricochet, a vision of American culture that has refined and broadened his own youthful sensibility.

British director Terence Davies, whose films combine style with emotion both exquisitely and inventively, is also one of the great autobiographers of cinema. His third feature film, “The Neon Bible,” from 1995 (now streaming free on Tubi and Pluto), is a devious autobiography – it’s an adaptation of a novel written by teenage John Kennedy Toole, and it tells the birth story of the aesthetic sensibility of a lonely and troubled boy. It is the first in Davies’ powerful series of expressly literary feature films. These include “The House of Mirth”, quite simply one of the best American literary adaptations ever to be filmed (and it is not available to stream, keep your DVDs), “A Quiet Passion” and its new movie. , “Benediction,” a bio-pic by poet Siegfried Sassoon, premiering this week at the Toronto Film Festival, and slated for US release next year. “The Neon Bible” is also, like all of Davies’ feature films, a musical, of a personal and original genre. Davies said that the art that movies are most like is music. (I agree.) He spoke (and for that matter filmed autobiographically) of awakening his own sensitivity through singing – the casual, domestic song of women – which has filled his daily life. childhood, in Liverpool, as well as through the Hollywood musicals which have been his inspirations since then. “The Neon Bible” tells the story of a professional singer who breaks into the narrow life of a boy in a small town in the South. The singer is played by one of the greatest actors, Gena Rowlands, who covers the film with passion and style, just as her character makes the life of the boy.

“The Neon Bible” is a film from memory. It’s built entirely as flashbacks of the sorry night train in which teenager David (Jacob Tierney), who is all fifteen or sixteen, flees his hometown and remembers the events that led to his desperate escape. (His deep mood is accompanied by a deep cut from Glenn Miller, the chromatic and melodramatic “Perfidia.”) The action takes place in the 1940s, from the beginning of the decade to the end of World War II; it begins with the teenager’s childhood memories (young David is played by Drake Bell), when his aunt Mae (Rowlands) comes to live with him, his mother, Sarah (Diana Scarwid), and his father, Frank ( Denis Leary), in their cramped and struggling home, monotonous and stressed by depression. From the start, Mae is an outsider for her free spirit and the freedom with which she flaunts it. The community is fervent, conservative and religious, and Sarah blames them for the bright colors and tight fit of her clothes upon arrival. Frank wants to throw her out, but Sarah, within earshot of David, says Mae has nowhere to go. Mae herself arrives with the bittersweet burden of memory – her singing career with local bands (her crowning glory was playing Biloxi), failed, and she found herself unemployed, penniless, penniless. resources. What remains to her are her newspaper clippings (which she reads to David like a book of tales from distant and glorious legend) and her memories – which Davies films with painful romance, in a single, drifting take. from the bare family porch to the light halcyon stage in which she performs “How Long Has This Been Going On?” with a jazz group, and return to its current and idle melancholy.

David is a bullied child and he forms a deep bond with Mae that further alienates him from his classmates. Mae invites him to wash his hair; she takes him for a walk around town, frantically calling him Franchot Tone (a star at the time) and herself Jean Harlow. Young David’s dream life is quickly shattered: there is a clamor near the house, and Frank carries David on his back to observe the uproar, which turns out to be a lynching that the neighbors, all white of course, deal with. like a festive event. It’s shattered again: While arguing over money, Frank brutally punches Sarah, leaving Mae to deal with her and David to fear for his life. With these two events, David steps onto the screen, with a special effect as simple as it is daring, from childhood and is forced into premature maturity, candid recognition of the monstrosity at hand and the terrifying urgency. to face it. He also becomes, now, Mae’s confidant, and she disproves him from visions of his former glory and contrasts his love of the stage with the degradations of the traveling music profession and the reckless and painful love life that accompanied it. (Rowlands plays Mae with her own singular energies – wise to the world but hopeful and impulsive, overwhelmed by the past but recklessly vacillating forward.) David realizes that Mae and her mother are figures of a tragedy. in which he is only a support player. but where, in adulthood, as a man, he will be called upon to play a role which still remains obscure to him.

Then the United States entered World War II. Frank goes to war and the intrusion of history with a capital “H” into the life of the family proves devastating. Davies films the important moments in a style that is both grandiose and hypersensitive. Majestically choreographed travellings show the men of the city walking towards the train which takes them to war; Mae’s spontaneous performance of “Chattanooga Choo Choo”, dancing with another woman, in a local venue, which rekindles Mae’s professional ambitions and career prospects; David’s recitation of a poem (by Longfellow) that marks him with a sensitivity that he knows makes him totally foreign to the city in which he lives. The eventful preaching at a revival meeting (which Davies films with fiery and rhetorical fascination), the racist and xenophobic political slurs on the radio, only intensify David’s desperation to escape. Yet David remains linked to his city by his responsibility to Sarah, who begins a heartbreaking descent into mental illness. His own romantic awakening and emotional frustrations, along with a growing sense of responsibility and confusion about his own place in the world, lead him to an explosive resolution that ultimately forces him to find his way at a good age. too young.

Davies films these memories of toil and anguish – of glimmers of aesthetic delight and worldly seduction, of romantic intensity and erotic torment, of the struggle for personal freedom – with slow images of dreamily choreographed actions, in a unique and complex style which, mixing majesty and intimacy, embodies the paradoxes of history. Davies is a gay man who grew up in a staunch Catholic community. No less than in his directly autobiographical, Liverpool-based films, he portrays the tensions of private self-definition and the air of oppression in the southern United States with a sense of rapturous wonder and trembling vulnerability. It turns “The Neon Bible” into a personal story by ricochet, a vision of the realities, both appalling and electrifying, of American culture which has refined and broadened its own youthful sensibility – the ambient violence and desperate struggles, the raw survival of noble impulses, the lonely spirit of stubborn adventure, of which the imagination itself is composed.


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Andrew Garfield can’t remember who he was before “Tick, Tick… ​​Boom!” http://carolchanning.org/andrew-garfield-cant-remember-who-he-was-before-tick-tick-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bboom/ http://carolchanning.org/andrew-garfield-cant-remember-who-he-was-before-tick-tick-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bboom/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 18:48:00 +0000 http://carolchanning.org/andrew-garfield-cant-remember-who-he-was-before-tick-tick-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bboom/ Jon (Andrew Garfield) throws a party, though there’s little reason to celebrate. He’s torn with anxiety, his cramped apartment is overcrowded, and he’s just spent money he doesn’t have, a down payment on success that won’t come in his lifetime. But still, with a big smile, Jon toasts his friends, jumps on his couch and […]]]>

Jon (Andrew Garfield) throws a party, though there’s little reason to celebrate. He’s torn with anxiety, his cramped apartment is overcrowded, and he’s just spent money he doesn’t have, a down payment on success that won’t come in his lifetime. But still, with a big smile, Jon toasts his friends, jumps on his couch and sings: “C’est la vie!”

Jon is Jonathan Larson, the composer and playwright who died suddenly of an aortic aneurysm at the age of 35 in 1996 just before his new musical, “Rent”, became a worldwide hit. The new movie “Tick, Tick… ​​Boom!” portrays Larson struggling to be successful in his late twenties, as he questions whether he should get down to it and choose a more conventional path than the musical theater script.

Larson originally created “Tick, Tick… ​​Boom!” as a solo exhibition, “Boho Days”, with himself in 1990; after his death, it was reworked by playwright David Auburn into a three-person production that “Hamilton” creator Lin-Manuel Miranda saw in 2001, while still in his final year of college.

“Here’s that posthumous musical from the guy who made me want to write musicals in the first place,” said Miranda, who has now made her directorial debut with the film.

Miranda saw Garfield in the 2018 Broadway production of “Angels in America” ​​and thought he was “transcendent” in that show. “I walked away thinking, ‘Oh, this guy can do anything,'” the director recalls. “I didn’t know if he could sing, but I felt like he could do anything. So I projected it in my head probably a year before I told him about it.

Miranda put Garfield to the test, sending him to a vocal coach and making sure the actor would be able to play the piano enough for the camera to move from his fingers to his face throughout the film. But these are just the technical aspects of an impressive performance: Garfield plays the passionate and frustrated Larson with enough zealous verve to power all the lights on Broadway.

The 38-year-old actor, who recently appeared in “The Eyes of Tammy Faye” as disgraced televangelist Jim Bakker and, if the buzz in the Hollywood press is correct, will fit alongside Tom Holland and Tobey Maguire in “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” released in December. (On this super-secret superhero team, Garfield can’t divulge anything.) Still, it’s clear that “Tick, Tick… ​​Boom!” Meant a lot. more for him than he initially expected.

“It’s a weird thing when there’s someone like Jon that you had no relationship with before, and then suddenly there’s this mysterious forever bond that I’m never, ever going to let go,” me. Garfield said on a recent video call. from Calgary, Canada, where he filmed “Under the Banner of Heaven”, a limited series. “I feel so lucky that Jon was revealed to me, because now I can’t remember who I was until I knew who Jon was.”

Here are edited excerpts from our conversation.

How “Tic, Tic … Boom!” »Come to you originally?

One of my best friends in New York is Gregg Miele, and he’s the great New York City bodybuilder and masseur – he works on every dancer, actor, and singer on Broadway and beyond. Lin was at his table one morning and asked, “Can Andrew Garfield sing? And Gregg, being the friend that he is, just started lying, basically, and said, “Yeah, he’s the greatest singer I’ve ever heard.” Then he called me and said, “Hey, go take singing lessons because Lin is going to ask you to do something.

Lin and I had lunch and he briefly told me about “Tick, Tick” and Jon. I’m not a musical theater guy in my history – it’s not something that was introduced to me until the last few years, really. So Lin left me a copy of the music and the lyrics, and he wrote at the beginning, “It won’t make sense now, but it will. Siempré, Lin.

You played in plays like “Angels in America” and “Death of a salesman”On Broadway, but in this movie, Lin has surrounded you with a lot of musical theater ringers, and even some of the smaller roles and cameos are filled by major actors of this world. It must have been an intimidating space to enter.

I remember a very precise moment when we were in musical rehearsal. Alex Lacamoire was at the piano to guide us through the songs – he is the musical arranger and producer of Lin – and I was with [“Tick, Tick” co-stars] Robin de Jesus and Vanessa Hudgens and Josh Henry and Alex Shipp. You can imagine how I feel! They’re just pros, they know exactly what they’re doing, they take notes. I’m like, “Oh my God, I’m going to die.”

Then comes the time for me to get into the song and just try to get through it. I remember Alex Lacamoire saying, “Woo, Andrew! And then everyone behind him, like Josh and Vanessa and Alex and Robin, was like, “Yeah baby, that’s it baby!” You got it, baby! I turn beetroot red and five minutes go by, and I’m just like, “Hey guys, sorry. I start to cry and say, “I don’t know if I’ve ever been so happy in my whole life to be surrounded by the most supportive liars I’ve ever known.”

Jonathan spends the film worrying about that ticking that only he can hear. How did you interpret this?

There was a line in the original one-man show “Boho Days”: “Sometimes I feel like my heart is going to explode.” It was too much on the nose for people after his death, and they had to cut it, but he spends the story trying to figure out what this ticking is: “Are we 30? ? Did I not succeed? Is it an unconscious idea of ​​my girlfriend’s body clock combined with the pressure of my career? Or are all my friends losing their lives at a very young age to the AIDS epidemic?

It could even be a musical metronome. The way you play Jonathan, as a theatrical person who feels so deep and urgent, it’s almost like he needs to sing because normal life isn’t enough.

Everything is at 11 a.m. Even when he makes love, it’s at 11am! Somehow he knows this is all going to end, that it is all so fleeting, and I think he was deeply, painfully aware that he wasn’t going to blackmail his whole song. And I think he was also awfully aware that he wouldn’t get the thoughtfulness and recognition he knew he was meant to have while he was still breathing.

On the last day of filming, what I understood was that Jon understood it. He knew it was a short and sacred ride, and he had a lot of keys and secrets on how to live with ourselves and with each other and make sense of being here. Once he accepted that, he could be a full part of the world, and then he could write “Rent”. I don’t think there is an accident in there. This very visceral knowledge of loss and death is what makes everything so meaningful. And without this awareness, we will succumb to absurdity.

So what meaning did this story give you?

Every frame, every moment, every breath in this film is an attempt to honor Jon. And, on a more personal level, it’s an honor for my mom. He was someone who showed me where I needed to go in my life. She put me on a path. We lost her just before Covid, just before we started filming, after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. So for me I was able to continue his song about the ocean and the wave of Jonathan’s songs. It was an attempt to honor her in her unfinished song, and her in her unfinished song, and bring them together.

I think that’s part of the reason I didn’t want this movie to end, because I had to put my grief into the art, into this creative act. The privilege of my life has been to be there for my mother, being the person who gave her permission when she was ready. We had a very amazing connection, and now an audience will subconsciously know his mind through Jon, whom I find so magical and beautiful.

Still, that’s a lot to deal with while you’re shooting this movie. It couldn’t have been easy.

I was reluctant to share this, but I feel like it’s a universal experience. At best, we lose our parents and not the other way around, so I feel very lucky that I was able to be with her during her passing, and was able to read her favorite poems and take care of her. and my father and my brother. I have already lost people, but mother is something else. It is the person who gives you life no longer there. Nothing can prepare you for this kind of disaster. For me, everything has changed: where there used to be a stream, there is now a mountain; where there was once a volcano, there is now a field. It’s a strange head trip.

You put parts of yourself into others, almost as if they are stewards of who you are. And when you lose these people, you suddenly become their steward.

As you say, it’s like my mother is now living in me in a way that is maybe even stronger than ever when she was embodied. I feel its essence. For me, it only comes when we can accept the loss, and it’s so hard for us to do that in our culture because we don’t have the framework or the tools to do it. We are told to be in the delusion and denial of this universally compelling thing that we are all going to go through at some point, and it is fascinating to me that this great adventure of death is not honored.

In fact, the only thing that makes that sense is if we are walking with death in the far corner of our left eye. This is the only way we are aware that we are alive right now. I think that was the legacy Jon leaves and the legacy my mom leaves me personally, it’s just being here. Because you’re not going to be here for long.

It reminds me of what was written on your script before all of this happened: “You don’t understand now, but you will understand.”

“You don’t understand now, but you will understand.” I’m still in shock from downloading to figure out what Jon’s life was like, what my mom’s life was, what it was all about. Oh my God, what a chance to explore this in his work!


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