Non-binary characters like “Gonzo Rera” light up children’s television and encourage self-acceptance.

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“Children learn a lot from what is expressed in the media and look for characters they can identify,” she said.

According to Edwards Reaper, when children identify a character they are involved with on television, they “internalize the aspect of how that character is perceived and treated by others.” is. And if the treatment is positive, aggression can affect young viewers, increase self-confidence and test their own way of expressing the genre.

But perhaps the biggest impact is on their parents, not on young audiences, she said.

“These phrases make it more important for cisgender parents and other adults to reject gender binaries and to embrace the gender diversity of their children more for their psychological health and quality of life. Help teach, ”said Edwards Reaper.

Giving children an example of what a diverse gender character looks like gives them language to express themselves more fully, especially when the character is accepted and loved. We can deliver it, Edwards-Reaper said.

“Many young people of diverse gender talk about what they didn’t know about diverse gender identities and that they have language that explains what they felt until they were expressed in the media,” she declared. Noted.

Even Sugar said that creating a “Steven Universe” helped them understand each other better and introduced them to their community.

Non-binary characters like “Gonzo Rera” light up children’s television and encourage self-acceptance.

Source link Non-binary characters like “Gonzo Rera” light up children’s television and encourage self-acceptance.

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